September 2018

RSE18 conference, Birmingham

Author: Fiona Reid
Posted: 6 Sep 2018 | 14:47

I recently attended the Third Research Software Engineers (RSE) conference in Birmingham, UK. RSE conferences bring together people who work in an RSE-type roll from across the UK and world.

For anyone who doesn’t know, an RSE is typically someone who has expertise in both coding and research but is not necessarily a pure computer programmer or pure researcher. Often RSEs can be the only such person in their department and thus the conference gives them a chance meet other people doing similar roles to share their experiences and help them feel part of a much larger community.

Supercomputing MOOC: learning at scale!

Author: Jane Kennedy
Posted: 6 Sep 2018 | 13:05

What is a MOOC, you ask? The answer is, it's a Massively Open Online Course, and EPCC's Supercomputing MOOC will start on 24th September.

Our MOOC was first launched in June 2017. Since then, it's had another two successful runs, and we're now making preparation for a fourth - not a bad year's work!

SpiNNaker arrives in the Bayes!

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 6 Sep 2018 | 11:28

The SpiNNaker neuromorphic high-performance computing platform, which aims to run 1% of the human brain in real time, will arrive at EPCC in the Bayes building this year. SpiNNaker is a novel hardware platform due to its massive parallelism, multi-cast communication fabric and low power design.

High-performance ray tracing for room acoustics

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 3 Sep 2018 | 15:40

The Auralisation of Acoustics in Architecture project is considering how to improve the modelling of sound qualities in rooms, whether existing, planned or ruined. Brian Hamilton of the University of Edinburgh's Acoustics & Audio Group writes about this collaboration with EPCC.

Last August EPCC’s James Perry, Kostas Kavoussanakis and I started work on the Auralisation of Acoustics in Architecture (A3) project. One of its goals was to explore the use of ray-tracing techniques to model the sound qualities of a room. Such a tool could help optimise the acoustics of an existing or future concert hall, improving the audience’s listening experience. It could also help recreate the sound characteristics of ruined historical spaces.

Pages