December 2020

A researcher's perspective on working with the Software Sustainability Institute

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 11 Dec 2020 | 08:50

By Edward Wallace, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh.

Why I need sustainable software for my research

I run a lab, or research group, in the School of Biological Sciences at Edinburgh. My group  is funded by the Wellcome Trust, the Royal Society and BBSRC. We're interested in questions about how cells decide which proteins to make and when. Also, how cells change which proteins they make when they learn something from the environment and need to change what they're doing. In the 21st century we collect some very large datasets to measure this. There are datasets based on sequencing the RNA, which encodes protein, and datasets that measure all the proteins in cells at the same time. These datasets are measuring thousands of different things in many samples, often dozens of samples. Each dataset is gigabytes in size, and so it's quite hard work to dig into them and get the simplest and most relevant answers about what cells are doing.

Software Sustainability Institute’s Collaborations Workshop 2021

Author: Mario Antonioletti
Posted: 8 Dec 2020 | 14:47

The Software Sustainability Institute’s Collaborations Workshop 2021 (CW21) will take place online from March 30–April 1 2021. Registration is now open!

Modelling triple stellar interactions during a pandemic

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 8 Dec 2020 | 10:46

Alexey Bobrick (Lund UniversitySpirit of 2020. My host and me, on one of the top floors in Birmingham University.(link is external), Sweden) was an HPC-Europa3 visitor hosted by Dr Silvia Toonen (link is external)at the Institute of Gravitational Wave Astronomy(link is external), University of Birmingham, UK. Because of COVID-19 restrictions, Alexey's visit has been split between his time in Birmingham (from 1–23 November), and working remotely from Sweden until 23 December. In this post Alexey tells us about his trip to Birmingham.

I study binary stellar astrophysics at Lund University, Sweden. In Birmingham my host, Dr Silvia Toonen, is one of the leading experts in triple and binary stellar evolution. I arrived at my accommodation in the middle of the autumnal Edgbaston Park area next to Birmingham University, and next morning I met my host. She kindly showed me around the campus and introduced me to her colleagues. The image shows me and my host, on one of the top floors in Birmingham University.  We then launched into many science discussions, which continued in the following weeks, together with meetings, work, calculations and more discussions.

Exploring Fujitsu’s A64FX CPU

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 2 Dec 2020 | 14:20

The release of Fujitsu’s A64FX CPU has been a high point in an otherwise disappointing year. This next-generation CPU is the brain in Fugaku, the supercomputer at RIKEN in Japan, which was number one in the June 2020 TOP500 list.

Since February, Fujitsu has given EPCC access to a development A64FX machine as part of an early-access programme. We have been exploring the performance of this technology applied to numerous HPC workloads.

Extreme-scale precision imaging in radio astronomy

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 2 Dec 2020 | 10:00

EPCC has embarked on a new collaboration with Prof. Yves Wiaux (Heriot-Watt University) to advance algorithms for high-precision and high-sensitivity computational imaging. 

The EIRA (Extreme-Scale Precision Imaging in Radio Astronomy) collaboration will focus on radio astronomy, which uses radio telescopes to collect data. This allows observation of the sky with antennae arrays at otherwise inaccessible angular resolutions and sensitivities. Algorithms being developed at Heriot-Watt University will address the challenges of building images from these incomplete linear data sets.

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