Software development

PickCells and exploratory image analysis in cell biology

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 11 Sep 2018 | 16:09

Cells being analysed within PickCells

PickCells is an image analysis platform developed by the Centre for Regenerative Medicine (CRM) at The University of Edinburgh. It combines generic image analysis algorithms, visualisation modules and data mining functionality within a stand-alone Java application.

RSE18 conference, Birmingham

Author: Fiona Reid
Posted: 6 Sep 2018 | 14:47

I recently attended the Third Research Software Engineers (RSE) conference in Birmingham, UK. RSE conferences bring together people who work in an RSE-type roll from across the UK and world.

For anyone who doesn’t know, an RSE is typically someone who has expertise in both coding and research but is not necessarily a pure computer programmer or pure researcher. Often RSEs can be the only such person in their department and thus the conference gives them a chance meet other people doing similar roles to share their experiences and help them feel part of a much larger community.

Collaborative environment for sales prospect generation

Author: Alistair Grant
Posted: 23 Aug 2018 | 07:41

 

deepminer logoSo, you read the title and thought, ‘What?'

Well maybe it is something you could be interested in using. Perhaps the technology or concepts will interest you. Or maybe you will see how EPCC can help bring your ideas into the world.

Let’s start from the beginning – there is this company called DeepMiner which was set up in August 2017 and they had this idea of using all this new-fangled data science, modelling and machine learning to gather huge amounts of disparate data on company news, business deals, research grants and many other things to help businesses to try and identify new business prospects – hence the 'sales prospect' in the title.

Software deposit guidance for researchers

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 8 Aug 2018 | 10:55

Safe deposit boxes

The Software Sustainability Institute has published a set of guides to depositing research software into digital repositories. The guides, development of which was funded by Jisc, are intended for researchers, principal investigators and research leaders, and research data and digital repository managers.

Research software is an integral part of the modern research ecosystem. Taken together, research software – alongside data, facilities, equipment, and an overarching research question – can be viewed as a research activity or experiment, worthy to be published. Conversely, a publication can be considered as a narrative that describes how the research objects are used together to reply to the research question.

PRACE Summer of HPC brings the summer to Edinburgh

Author: Ben Morse
Posted: 27 Jul 2018 | 09:18

The PRACE Summer of HPC 2018 provides an opportunity for up to 23 applicants from across Europe to apply to one of the PRACE supercomputing centres to work on a PRACE-related piece of work for eight weeks over the summer. 

The projects are preceded by a training week, hosted this year by EPCC in Edinburgh alongside ARCHER and PRACE Advanced Training Centre courses. The training week is designed to build a community between the Summer of HPC participants and to provide the necessary skills for students to begin their projects. Flights and accommodation are provided by the programme with a stipend to cover living costs.

Software Deposit and Preservation Workshop

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 24 Jul 2018 | 16:50

Deposit button

On the 11th July, the Software Sustainability Institute and Jisc ran a Software Deposit and Preservation Workshop at St Anne's College, Oxford. This workshop brought together twelve research data managers, digital repository vendors, publishers, policymakers and researchers. We reviewed draft guidance on software deposit and preservation, discussed software deposit and preservation from the perspectives of the foregoing stakeholders, and explored ways in which to drive forward the adoption of best practices in software deposit and preservation.

Arnau Miro: an HPC Europa visitor's report

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 4 Jul 2018 | 10:22

Arnau Miró was an HPC-Europa visitor from 10th Jan–9th Apr 2018. He was hosted by Dr Charles Moulinec at STFC Daresbury Laboratory.

Hello everyone! My name is Arnau Miró and I am a third-year PhD student from Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya. I’m working in the Aerospace department in collaboration with the Barcelona Supercomputing Center Computer Applications in Science and Engineering department. I visited EPCC under the HPC-Europa3 transnational access programme, although I was mainly hosted by Dr Charles Moulinec at STFC Daresbury Laboratory.

HPC-Europa3: an overview

Author: Catherine Inglis
Posted: 26 Apr 2018 | 12:13

The HPC-Europa3 Transnational Access programme includes access to world-class HPC systems and scientific collaboration with host researchers in any field. If you want to find out more about the programme then this video, originally part of the ARCHER series of webinars, is an excellent starting point.

March 2018 meeting of the MPI Forum

Author: Daniel Holmes
Posted: 21 Apr 2018 | 16:21

In the March 2018 meeting of the MPI Forum, the “Persistent Collectives” proposal began the formal ratification procedure, the “Sessions” proposal took a step forward, but the “Fault Tolerance” saga took a step side-ways.

The proposal to add persistent collective operations to MPI was formally read at the March meeting, and was well-received by all those present. The first vote for this proposal will happen in June and the second vote in September. If all goes well, this addition to MPI will be announced at SC18.

Event Driven Asynchronous Tasks

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 5 Apr 2018 | 10:28

The INTERTWinE project has spent a lot of effort addressing interoperability challenges raised by task-based models. By rethinking parallelism in the paradigm of tasks, one reduces synchronisation and decouples the management of parallelism from computation.

This is really attractive but existing models typically rely on shared memory, where the programmer expresses input and output dependencies of tasks based upon variables, which in turn limits the technology to a single memory space – often a node of an HPC machine. So to then scale up beyond a single memory space we must combine a task model with distributed memory technology, such as MPI or GASPI, and this has been a focus for a number of activities in INTERTWinE.

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