Software development

The Message-Passing Interface: unlocking the power of software

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 8 Jan 2015 | 11:53

Simulation by IES of daylight on a building.

 

 

 

 

 

EPCC helped lead the way in creating the standardised Message-Passing Interface (MPI) programming system to enable faster, more powerful, problem solving using parallel computing. It is now the ubiquitous de-facto standard among both hardware and software vendors.

Mike Jackson and Dan Holmes explain how EPCC continues to be involved in its development and use.

Software for the Future

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 7 Jan 2015 | 10:18

Reconstructed neuronal connections in the brain Credit: Thomas Schultz - CC BY-SABig-Data compressive sensing: fast, parallelised and distributed algorithms

EPCC is excited to be part of a new project, funded through EPSRC's Software for the Future programme, to develop and exploit compressive-sensing algorithms for large-scale data problems.

Greenhouse gases and GPUs

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 17 Dec 2014 | 16:32

We have just reached the end of a short project collaborating with Atmospheric Geochemists at the universities of Edinburgh and Bristol. After they purchased two machines each, both with dual Intel Xeon Ivy-bridge 12-core CPUs and NVIDIA Tesla K20x GPUs, EPCC was tasked to investigate the feasability of using the GPUs to improve the performance of their software.

Software Carpentry returns to Edinburgh

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 11 Dec 2014 | 12:24

Edinburgh Software Carpentry workshop attendeesLast week EPCC's ARCHER training team ran another Software Carpentry workshop here in Edinburgh, on 3rd and 4th of December. The workshop provided attendees with an introduction to version control and Git, building programs with Python, automating tasks with Make, and how (and how much) to test programs. These were set within the context of best practices for scientific computing.

Intel Parallel Computing Centre: progress report

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 21 Nov 2014 | 10:29

EPCC's Grand Challenges Optimisation Centre, an Intel Parallel Computing Centre which we announced earlier in the year, has made significant progress over recent months. 

The collaboration was created to optimise codes for Intel processors, particularly to port and optimise scientific simulation codes for Intel Xeon Phi co-processors. As EPCC also runs the ARCHER supercomputer, which contains a large number of Intel Xeon processors (although no accelerators or co-processors), for EPSRC and other UK research funding councils, we also have a strong focus on ensuring that scientific simulation codes are highly optimised for these processors. Therefore, the IPCC work at EPCC has been concentrating on improving the performance of a range of codes that are heavily used for computational simulation in the UK on both Intel Xeon and Intel Xeon Phi processors.

Looking for help to improve your research software?

Author: Mario Antonioletti
Posted: 20 Nov 2014 | 12:22

The Software Sustainability Institute (SSI) is seeking applications to its Open Call for Projects, a free service that allows researchers to propose joint software consultancy projects with the Institute.

If you write code as part of your research and you are successful in your application you can get the SSI to help you improve your development processes and/or your code's sustainability at zero cost to yourself. Note that the call closes on the 5th December 2014.

Nu-FuSE: An Exascale software project

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 16 Nov 2014 | 23:11

The Nu-FuSE (Nuclear Fusion Simulations at Exascale) project was a 3-year, G8 funded, international research project to investigate the challenges and requirements for fusion simulations at Exascale levels. The project’s aim was to significantly improve computational modelling capabilities for fusion, and fusion-related sciences, enhancing the predictive capabilities needed to address key physics challenges of a new generation of fusion systems. 

Collaboration with UK Met Office

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 7 Nov 2014 | 15:39

We are working with the UK Met Office on a project to rewrite one of their weather forecasting models. Whilst the best known weather model is the Unified Model (UM), which generates the national and international forecast on a scale of 1km, the Met Office also has a number of other specialist models that concentrate on specific areas.  An example of this is in the study of cloud and cloud convection, in which case one often uses a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model which handles turbulence in much more detail. 

SPRINT v. 1.0.7 released on CRAN (R package repository)

Author: Eilidh Troup
Posted: 30 Oct 2014 | 16:28

sprinter

It's always good to end a project on a high so I was delighted to end my recent assignment to the SPRINT project by overcoming a few tricky technical obstacles and having the latest version of SPRINT accepted into the CRAN repository of add-on packages to the very popular R statistical computing software. This will make it much easier for users to discover and install SPRINT and gain from the fast processing of larger data sets that it can provide.

Applications open for Software Sustainability Institute 2015 Fellows

Author: Mario Antonioletti
Posted: 3 Sep 2014 | 13:30

The Software Sustainability Institute's Fellowship 2015 application process is now open.

The Fellowship Programme run by the Software Sustainability Institute (SSI) could fund you by up to £3000 over a fifteen-month period to become Software Sustainability ambassadors within your research community (or communities if you belong to more than one). It can also allow you to share your expertise and advice with the SSI. The Programme will enourage you to develop your interests in the area of software sustainability (especially in your own area of work). And it's a fantastic and active interdisciplinary community to be involved with, as well as providing you with a great CV entry! The Fellowship is open to UK-based applicants. If you are interested then read on.

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