Support for science

SSI conference: how to move an event online in three weeks

Author: Neil Chue Hong
Posted: 14 May 2020 | 10:00

The Collaborations Workshop is the annual flagship event of the Software Sustainability Institute. For the last ten years it has brought together researchers, developers, innovators, managers, funders, publishers, leaders, and educators to explore and share best practice.

The Workshop is a highly interactive event with about 100 participants, and is designed to facilitate meeting as many new people as possible. With the global pandemic forcing us to stay at home, could we successfully recreate the experience online, and with only three weeks to prepare?

Rapid Assistance in Modelling the Pandemic (RAMP) initiative

Author: Kostas Kavoussanakis
Posted: 1 May 2020 | 10:37

I am the Project Manager of the Rapid Assistance in Modelling the Pandemic (RAMP) initiative, supporting Prof. Mike Cates and the RAMP Steering Committee. RAMP was convened by the Royal Society in the UK to enhance existing COVID-19 initiatives. The motivation was to enhance the modelling teams who inform Government policy through channels such as SPI-M (Scientific Pandemic Influenza Modelling Group), which reports to SAGE (Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies).

PICTURES project: predicting disease with artificial intelligence

Author: Ally Hume
Posted: 10 Dec 2019 | 11:41

EPCC is part of a £4.4 million project to turn a database of millions of clinical images into a powerful research tool to help tackle health conditions including lung cancer and dementia.

Each year millions of clinical images such as X-rays, CT, MRI, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, and retinal images are generated by the NHS in Scotland and stored in the national imaging database. In addition to containing important clinical information, these images also potentially contain a great deal of information about the health of the individual which is not currently made use of in health care.

HPC-Europa3: “An excellent way to have international collaborations with excellent scientists”

Author: Catherine Inglis
Posted: 4 Dec 2019 | 16:04

The HPC-Europa3 programme funds collaborative visits of up to three months for researchers at any level, in any discipline, who need access to HPC resources.

HPC-Europa3 has now been welcoming visitors to EPCC – and another eight HPC centres around Europe – for nearly two years. The successful applicants to date are from a total of 43 countries. Priority is given to researchers working in the EU and Associated States, but limited places are available for researchers working elsewhere who can make a strong case for funding. There is a roughly equal split among the visitors between post-graduates, postdocs, and experienced researchers, and a wide variety of disciplines are represented.

We have been pleased to see that, compared to previous programmes, there has been an increase in the participation of female researchers, who have accounted for 23% of successful applications so far.

A public UK HPC knowledge base

Author: Andy Turner
Posted: 11 Nov 2019 | 08:49

Photo by Glen Noble on UnsplashIn this blog post I consider how we (as the UK HPC community) could create a community HPC technical knowledge base that would allow us to share and reuse useful technical information. Much of these thoughts came out of discussions at the HPC Champions meeting that took place on 16 September 2019 alongside the UK RSE Conference 2019 in Birmingham, UK along with subsequent discussions at the monthly HPC RSE calls.

Online LAMMPS training for ARCHER

Author: Julien Sindt
Posted: 31 Oct 2019 | 15:56

In October I ran an online training course teaching current and potential ARCHER users how to run LAMMPS. LAMMPS is a widely-used open-source molecular dynamics (MD) software developed at the National Sandia Laboratories, and is optimised to run well on HPC facilities. It consistently ranks in the top 10 most used programs on ARCHER. Although the course was run on ARCHER and with ARCHER users in mind, I tried to teach users how to use LAMMPS on any platform.

Mining digital historical textual data

Author: Rosa Filgueira
Posted: 23 Oct 2019 | 10:43

Over the last three decades the collections of libraries, archives and museums have been transformed by large-scale digitisation. The volume and quality of available digitised text now makes searching and linking these data feasible, where previous attempts were restricted due to limited data availability, quality, and lack of shared infrastructures. One example of this is the extensive digital collection offered by the National Library of Scotland (NLS) (see Figure 1) [1], which can be accessed online and also downloaded for further digital humanities research.

Society of Research Software Engineering launches

Author: Neil Chue Hong
Posted: 23 Sep 2019 | 12:26

The Society of Research Software Engineering launched on 18th September. You can now become a member of the Society and, in doing so, help support software in research and the people who develop it.

ARCHER Embedded Computational Science and Engineering projects

Author: Chris Johnson
Posted: 18 Sep 2019 | 16:01

Since the start of the ARCHER UK National Supercomputing Service service, one hundred eCSE (embedded Computational Science and Engineering) projects have been awarded funding to carry out code improvements for software running on ARCHER and future Tier-1 services. Projects have come from a diverse range of disciplines with principal investigators (PIs), Co-Investigators (Co-Is) and technical staff involved from 44 different institutions across the UK.

Analysing historical newspapers and books using Apache Spark and Cray Urika-GX

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 16 Aug 2019 | 16:25

Library booksIn our October 2018 blog post on Analysing humanities data using Cray Urika-GX, we described how we had been collaborating with Melissa Terras of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (CAHSS) at The University of Edinburgh to explore historical newspapers and books using the Alan Turing Institute's deployment of a Cray Urika-GX system ("Urika"). In this blog post we describe additional work we have done, to look at the origins of the term "stranger danger", find reports on the Krakatoa volcanic eruption of 1883, and explore the concept of "female emigration".

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