acoustics

High-performance ray tracing for room acoustics

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 3 Sep 2018 | 15:40

The Auralisation of Acoustics in Architecture project is considering how to improve the modelling of sound qualities in rooms, whether existing, planned or ruined. Brian Hamilton of the University of Edinburgh's Acoustics & Audio Group writes about this collaboration with EPCC.

Last August EPCC’s James Perry, Kostas Kavoussanakis and I started work on the Auralisation of Acoustics in Architecture (A3) project. One of its goals was to explore the use of ray-tracing techniques to model the sound qualities of a room. Such a tool could help optimise the acoustics of an existing or future concert hall, improving the audience’s listening experience. It could also help recreate the sound characteristics of ruined historical spaces.

NESS (Next Generation Sound Synthesis project) bows out

Author: Kostas Kavoussanakis
Posted: 12 Apr 2017 | 16:14

The Next Generation Sound Synthesis project (NESS) has concluded its five-year journey. With true inter-disciplinary focus, genuine user-engagement and over 75 publications overall, the project has been a great success for the University of Edinburgh, and for EPCC in particular.

Using HPC to understand human hearing

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 23 Jan 2015 | 14:58

The Auditory pilot project, involving EPCC and the University’s Acoustics and Audio Group, sought to use HPC to enable faster run times for computational models of the human hearing organ. Dr Michael Newton of the Group explains the work.

Simulating the acoustics of 3D rooms

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 5 Dec 2014 | 14:53

The NESS project is developing next-generation sound synthesis techniques based on physical models of acoustical systems. One key system targeted by NESS is the acoustics of 3D rooms. 

Computer simulation of 3D room acoustics has many practical applications such as the design of concert halls, virtual reality systems, and artificial reverberation effects for electroacoustic music and video games. 

Next Generation Sound Synthesis

Author: James Perry
Posted: 13 Aug 2013 | 14:16
When you think about applications for high performance computing and large-scale simulations, you probably think of particle physics, or climate modelling, maybe molecular biology. You probably don't think of music. But the Next Generation Sound Synthesis project (NESS) may change that.
 

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