Art

Art from supercomputing

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 21 Apr 2017 | 11:55

Last Thursday marked the opening of the FEAT project (Future Emerging Art and Technology) exhibition in Dundee’s LifeSpace art research gallery. The FEAT project is a pilot that focuses on the synergy between art and science, and how art can bring benefits to the scientific process. EPCC is involved through the INTERTWinE project.

For the past 12 months the artists Špela and Miha have been working with us on a piece related to supercomputing. They have spent time at a number of European supercomputing centres and additional FEAT workshops, such as the one in Vienna last summer that I attended and discussed in a previous blog article.

Bringing art and science together

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 1 Jul 2016 | 10:58

This week I have been at the FEAT (Future Emerging Art and Technology) workshop in Vienna, which aims to promote collaboration between scientists and artists. As I am sure many people will be aware, the EU-funded Future and Emerging Technology (FET) programme consists of scientific projects looking to push the boundaries of research in specific fields.

Re-imagining the lab. Or, when science meets art

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 13 Mar 2014 | 15:07

LabBook being used with a tablet and stylusLabBook is a mobile app and online service that allows users to securely record and share their experiment notes. LabBook's developers - Mark Woodbridge, Geraint Barton and Derek Huntley of Imperial College London's Bioinformatics Support Service - asked The Software Sustainability Institute for consultancy as part of the Institute's open call.

I've been working with them to provide advice on the LabBook software, how it is developed, and how it can be moved towards an open source product.

Changing technology – thinking about digital preservation

Author: Alistair Grant
Posted: 7 May 2013 | 13:52

How do we deal with technology change? Ever thought about accessing the stuff you did twenty years ago? What’s that? You are having a hard time getting a floppy disk drive? Maybe the data format is unreadable or the media has been damaged? 8-inch, 5,25-inch, and 3,5-inch floppy disks: Public Domain 7 June 2009: George Chernilevsky

This is a problem that will continue to face us in many fields: how do you ensure that today’s data is still accessible in twenty or even fifty years' time? For a lot of areas, maybe we do not want to bother, it's the here and now that counts.

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