CFD

Solve CFD problems from your desktop

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 29 Nov 2019 | 11:50

ENGYS is a global computer software company specialising in the development and distribution of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and design optimisation solutions for enterprises based on open-source technologies. The company’s software products include HELYX, a general-purpose CFD and design optimisation package for engineering applications, and ELEMENTS, a dedicated computer simulation software for automotive design.

HPC-CORE simulation software workshop

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 31 Jan 2016 | 23:07
 
Tidal simulation

Lancaster University, 7-8 April 2016

The programme for the HPC-CORE (High Performance Computing-based Computational fluid dynamics for Offshore Renewable Energy) workshop has now been published. This event brings together scientific specialists from Engineering, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, and HPC experts to discuss the state of the art for simulation software, and the leading-edge simulations being undertaken with such software.

TPLS 2.0 goes live

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 25 May 2015 | 11:52

Last week I took part in a Mini-Symposium at the University's School of Engineering to mark the 2.0 release of TPLS, a high-resolution 3D Direct Numerical Simulation code for two-phase flows that we have developed in collaboration with Dr Prash Valluri and Dr. Lennon Ó Náraigh.

CFD: parallel sustainability with TPLS

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 28 Apr 2014 | 16:20

Mathematical modelling of complex fluid flows has practical application within many industrial sectors including energy, the environment and health. Flow modelling can include oil and gas flows in long-distance pipelines or refinery distillation columns, liquid cooling of micro-electronic devices, carbon capture and cleaning processes, water treatment plants, blood flows in arteries, and enzyme interactions. Multi-phase flow modelling models flows consisting of gases, fluids and solids within a single system eg steam and water, or oil and gas within a pipe, or coal dust in the air.

Collaborating with EPCC

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 3 Jul 2013 | 08:38
 
This post was written by Jon Hill from Imperial College, who used to work at EPCC and has been collaborating with us recently. 
A snapshot of a tsunami simulation of the 1755 Lisbon seismogenic tsunami.

I always jump at the chance to work with EPCC. Not just because they are my former employers (ah, the joys of Friday buns). Nor is it due to Edinburgh  being one of my favourite cities and collaborating with EPCC is a good excuse to visit. The main reason for collaborating with EPCC is to use the wealth of experience the people working there have on making scientific code go even faster. Whilst this is extremely important to our research, we don't have the time to do both science and improve code performance.

Making waves: TPLS code released as Open Source

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 10 Jun 2013 | 12:26

TPLS (Two-Phase Level Set) is a Computational Fluid Dynamics code developed by Dr Prash Valluri of the University of Edinburgh's School of Engineering and Dr Lennon Ó Náraigh of University College Dublin. It simulates the interface between two fluid phases, a phenomenon with a number of industrial applications including oil and gas hydrate transport, cleaning processes, distillation/absorption, and evaporative cooling of microelectronics.

Software optimisation papers for SC13

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 23 May 2013 | 17:00

I've just finished working on two papers for this year's Supercomputing conference, SC13, which is going to be in Denver, Colorado, from the 17th-22nd November. EPCC will have an official presence, with an EPCC booth on the exhibition floor and a number of staff participating in the technical and education programmes. I thought this a good opportunity to write up some recent work I've been undertaking. 

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