Collaboration

Broadcasting your shell output

Author: Mario Antonioletti
Posted: 18 Oct 2018 | 12:47

During a Software Carpentry course you, as an instructor, stand in front of a class typing your lesson content, eg bash or git, and the students type what you type into their own shell.

Depending on the layout of the room, you need to make the font on your terminal large enough for all students to see it, which can be somewhat disorientating as an instructor. Moreover if the layout of the room is not ideal, eg some students are facing away from the screen, they will have to constantly turn to see the screen, which can be a pain for them. But I recently found a Python app that changes all that.

Collaborative environment for sales prospect generation

Author: Alistair Grant
Posted: 23 Aug 2018 | 07:41

 

deepminer logoSo, you read the title and thought, ‘What?'

Well maybe it is something you could be interested in using. Perhaps the technology or concepts will interest you. Or maybe you will see how EPCC can help bring your ideas into the world.

Let’s start from the beginning – there is this company called DeepMiner which was set up in August 2017 and they had this idea of using all this new-fangled data science, modelling and machine learning to gather huge amounts of disparate data on company news, business deals, research grants and many other things to help businesses to try and identify new business prospects – hence the 'sales prospect' in the title.

Collaboration, collaboration, collaboration

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 15 Jun 2016 | 13:35

This week sees our annual collaboration workshop with Tsukuba University, Japan (more details are available here).  This is a great chance to get a flavour of the kind of research another HPC centre is undertaking, how they work, and what platforms they are investing in.

The Centre for Computational Sciences (CCS) at Tsukuba is a department very like EPCC, in that it is responsible for high performance and parallel computing at the university, runs and supports large-scale computers for researchers, and undertakes parallel computing research.

VOX-FE GUI developments

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 25 Jan 2015 | 15:55

For the last few years, I have had the opportunity to collaborate with Prof. Michael Fagan of the Medical and Biological Engineering group at the University of Hull on the development of his VOX-FE voxel finite-element (FE) bone modelling software. Past projects under EPSRC and HECToR dCSE funding allowed us to improve the scaling of the core solver and implementent parallel I/O, but it has become increasingly apparently that this was papering over the cracks, and a complete re-engineering of the code base would be required to make it portable, scalable and flexible enough to be useable.  

Software for the Future

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 7 Jan 2015 | 10:18

Reconstructed neuronal connections in the brain Credit: Thomas Schultz - CC BY-SABig-Data compressive sensing: fast, parallelised and distributed algorithms

EPCC is excited to be part of a new project, funded through EPSRC's Software for the Future programme, to develop and exploit compressive-sensing algorithms for large-scale data problems.

Greenhouse gases and GPUs

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 17 Dec 2014 | 16:32

We have just reached the end of a short project collaborating with Atmospheric Geochemists at the universities of Edinburgh and Bristol. After they purchased two machines each, both with dual Intel Xeon Ivy-bridge 12-core CPUs and NVIDIA Tesla K20x GPUs, EPCC was tasked to investigate the feasability of using the GPUs to improve the performance of their software.

Project ExTASY: solving the sampling problem

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 15 Oct 2013 | 12:18

Alongside APES, EPCC plays an important role in another project jointly funded by EPSRC and the US National Science Foundation to overcome one of the "Grand Challenges in the Chemical Sciences".

Free Energy Landscape of Alanine-12

Collaborating with EPCC

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 3 Jul 2013 | 08:38
 
This post was written by Jon Hill from Imperial College, who used to work at EPCC and has been collaborating with us recently. 
A snapshot of a tsunami simulation of the 1755 Lisbon seismogenic tsunami.

I always jump at the chance to work with EPCC. Not just because they are my former employers (ah, the joys of Friday buns). Nor is it due to Edinburgh  being one of my favourite cities and collaborating with EPCC is a good excuse to visit. The main reason for collaborating with EPCC is to use the wealth of experience the people working there have on making scientific code go even faster. Whilst this is extremely important to our research, we don't have the time to do both science and improve code performance.

EPCC Roadshows

Author: Mario Antonioletti
Posted: 1 Jul 2013 | 15:19


Recently I have been taking the 'EPCC Roadshow' around local university departments, usually with a colleague or two, giving an overview of EPCC: who we are, what we do and how we can be of assistance. It is surprising how little communication takes place within a large institution and how little knowledge there is about what is available at one’s very own doorstep.

Making waves: TPLS code released as Open Source

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 10 Jun 2013 | 12:26

TPLS (Two-Phase Level Set) is a Computational Fluid Dynamics code developed by Dr Prash Valluri of the University of Edinburgh's School of Engineering and Dr Lennon Ó Náraigh of University College Dublin. It simulates the interface between two fluid phases, a phenomenon with a number of industrial applications including oil and gas hydrate transport, cleaning processes, distillation/absorption, and evaporative cooling of microelectronics.

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