Data

Securely citing datasets

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 22 Aug 2013 | 14:50

This post was written by Adrian Mouat, a former EPCC employee who is now an independent software consultant.

Citing a paper is a reasonably straightforward and well-defined task; just give a reference to the author and the publication you found the paper in and you're pretty much there. Anyone else who wants to look up the reference just has to find the publication and they should see exactly the same text you saw.

Unfortunately, citing datasets is not as simple, at least not if you want the security of knowing that readers who follow the citation will find exactly the same data you used.

Wait a minute, where *are* my data?

Author: Rob Baxter
Posted: 7 Aug 2013 | 11:56

Policy restrictions on data storage can make the straightforward technological problems complex, over-constrained and potentially insoluble.

Pic credit:  Jeff Rowley Big Wave Surfer

As the slowly toppling wave of research data begins to overwhelm us all, we're increasingly looking for new ways to automate the management of all these bits. Keeping human curators and data managers in the loop becomes ever more unscalable and unsustainable. So, we're storing data in the Cloud, auto-replicating them five ways so we don't lose any, letting the systems manage the data for us.

Changing technology – thinking about digital preservation

Author: Alistair Grant
Posted: 7 May 2013 | 13:52

How do we deal with technology change? Ever thought about accessing the stuff you did twenty years ago? What’s that? You are having a hard time getting a floppy disk drive? Maybe the data format is unreadable or the media has been damaged? 8-inch, 5,25-inch, and 3,5-inch floppy disks: Public Domain 7 June 2009: George Chernilevsky

This is a problem that will continue to face us in many fields: how do you ensure that today’s data is still accessible in twenty or even fifty years' time? For a lot of areas, maybe we do not want to bother, it's the here and now that counts.

Sunshine, snow and persistent data infrastructure

Author: Rob Baxter
Posted: 1 May 2013 | 11:00

The high desert in New Mexico

I've recently returned from a very interesting week-long tour of the southwestern USA. Work-related, of course. I and a handful of European colleagues from the EUDAT project were graciously hosted by three groups all engaged in data infrastructure work on the other side of the Atlantic.

After flying into what must be one of the world's smallest and cutest airports in Santa Fe, our first stop was Los Alamos National Lab and the Web science group led by Herbert Van de Sompel.

Data sans frontieres

Author: Rob Baxter
Posted: 21 Mar 2013 | 16:32

Monday 18th March, a chilly day in Gothenburg, Sweden, and the formal launch of the Research Data Alliance. With keynotes from EU Commissioner Neelie Kroes, Australian Ambassador to the EU Duncan Lewis and NSF Director of Computer and Information Science and Engineering Farnam Jahanian this was a significant event, and indication of the importance that policy makers and funders are now attaching to the management of, and access to, research data worldwide.

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