Modelling

Reducing uncertainty in geological modelling

Author: Anna Roubickova
Posted: 5 Dec 2019 | 11:57

Cognitive Geology Ltd is an independent technology company based in Edinburgh, UK. It delivers innovative geological modelling software to the oil and gas industry, with the goal of improving efficiency and reducing uncertainty in geological modelling workflows and the business decisions which are based on them. EPCC has worked with the company to investigate ways to reduce large ensembles of geological models while maintaining the range of plausible scenarios described by the set.

New Prosperity Partnership to develop world first in high-fidelity engineering simulations

Author: Michele Weiland
Posted: 5 Nov 2018 | 14:44

A consortium led by Rolls-Royce and EPCC was recently awarded an EPSRC Prosperity Partnership worth £14.7m to develop the next generation of engineering simulation and modelling techniques, with the aim of developing the world’s first high-fidelity simulation of a complete gas-turbine engine during operation.

Connecting business to HPC and cloud resources

Author:
Posted: 17 Nov 2016 | 10:03

Fortissimo is a collaborative EC-funded project that enables European SMEs to be more competitive globally through the use of simulation services running on a high performance computing (HPC) cloud infrastructure.

Fortissimo Marketplace: a one-stop-shop for modelling and simulation services

Author: Mark Sawyer
Posted: 3 Jun 2016 | 14:34

 

A consortium of Europe’s leading supercomputing centres and HPC experts is developing the Fortissimo Marketplace, a one-stop-shop where end-users will access modelling and simulation services, plus high-performance data analytics.

Numerical modelling of clouds and atmospheric flows

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 11 Dec 2015 | 14:39

 

 

 

 

The Met Office/NERC Cloud model (MONC) has been developed in a collaboration between EPCC and the Met Office. MONC delivers a highly scalable and flexible Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model capable of simulating clouds and other turbulent flows at resolutions of tens of metres on very large domains.  

Using HPC to understand human hearing

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 23 Jan 2015 | 14:58

The Auditory pilot project, involving EPCC and the University’s Acoustics and Audio Group, sought to use HPC to enable faster run times for computational models of the human hearing organ. Dr Michael Newton of the Group explains the work.

HPC for business

Author: Mark Sawyer
Posted: 18 Aug 2014 | 13:10

The Fortissimo project, which is coordinated here at EPCC, gives companies a low-risk opportunity to try out HPC. By combining it with cloud computing, they can gain the benefits without buying and running their own systems. Here are three examples of HPC in action under Fortissimo.

Fortissimo! Digital simulation and modelling for European industry

Author: Mark Parsons
Posted: 10 Oct 2013 | 10:27

I am very pleased to announce the start of Fortissimo, a 3-year project led by EPCC that will focus on the development of a Cloud of HPC resources for use, initially, by European manufacturing companies, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Supercomputing at Bang Goes the Borders

Author: Mario Antonioletti
Posted: 23 Sep 2013 | 09:43
 
For the second year running, EPCC attended Bang Goes the Borders, a free science festival held in St Mary's Primary School in Melrose. This was my first time at the festival but my fellow EPCC'ers Iain Bethune and Terry Sloan were old hands, both having done it last year. We set up four stands in a classroom we were allocated, with the first overseen by Terry who ran two exercises showing the benefits of using parallelism to solve problems.

Dinosaur racing, two months later

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 30 Aug 2013 | 09:43

The PRACE Summer of HPC is a placement programme for undergraduate and postgraduate students. This post was written by Antoine Dewilde, one of the students who spent the summer here at EPCC.

In a previous post, I presented my project on making a dinosaur racing competition. In that post, I gave some background information about virtual palaeontology, and the purpose of my project here in Edinburgh. If you haven’t read it yet, now might be a good time to do so!

So, now that the project (and the summer) is almost finished, let us see what has happened in these past two months – and what you will soon be able to enjoy!

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