MONC

EPCC at the NERC showcase event

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 24 Oct 2017 | 15:14

The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) will run its showcase event at Dynamic Earth entitied UnEarthed from 17th-20th November. This will be a chance for the general public to interact with over thirty exhibts from all over NERC's science remit and to understand how UK scientists are answering some of the biggest questions on Earth.

Summer of HPC comes to an end

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 2 Sep 2016 | 11:08

This week we said goodbye to our Summer of HPC students Anna, Marta and Tomislav.

These students from around Europe have spent the last 7 weeks with us at EPCC immersed in HPC, and each working on a specific project in the field. This is a great because not only do they gain experience and interest in HPC but we also get a useful, tangible, outcome from these projects.

Summer of HPC: Finding the fireball

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 18 Aug 2016 | 14:51

Summer of HPC visitor Tomislav Subic gives a summary of his project at EPCC: a visualisation of the UK Met Office's weather model.

A legend says that there was once a warm sunny day in Scotland. I have started my quest to find out if the myth was true, but I was not the only one.

Numerical modelling of clouds and atmospheric flows

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 11 Dec 2015 | 14:39

 

 

 

 

The Met Office/NERC Cloud model (MONC) has been developed in a collaboration between EPCC and the Met Office. MONC delivers a highly scalable and flexible Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model capable of simulating clouds and other turbulent flows at resolutions of tens of metres on very large domains.  

Collaboration with UK Met Office

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 7 Nov 2014 | 15:39

We are working with the UK Met Office on a project to rewrite one of their weather forecasting models. Whilst the best known weather model is the Unified Model (UM), which generates the national and international forecast on a scale of 1km, the Met Office also has a number of other specialist models that concentrate on specific areas.  An example of this is in the study of cloud and cloud convection, in which case one often uses a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model which handles turbulence in much more detail.