Software development

Testing code

Author: Stephen Booth
Posted: 24 Oct 2016 | 12:25

It's always a bit of an embarrassment when talking about your code tests. I think most developers know that they don’t have enough tests or that their tests are not good enough.

There is never enough time to either write or to run tests that fully cover all possibilities so, like all types of programming, testing becomes a compromise where you try to make the best use of the limited resources available for testing.

Benevolent dictator vs democracy: which are you coding for?

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 27 Sep 2016 | 16:47

Developing for the real world

As part of a recent ARCHER eCSE project I developed a new parallelisation strategy for a computational simulation application to enable it to scale efficiently to larger process counts. We managed to significantly reduce the parallel overheads, so the code was accepted into the main repository for users to exploit.

If you're only going to learn one programming language, you should learn...

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 21 Jun 2016 | 07:59

Choice, choice, choice A Piper

I'm often asked "What programming language should I learn for scientific computing?".  Or I get involved in religious-like discussions about the best programming language for a particular task, or of all time (think Python vs Fortran, Go vs C, etc...). What's my answer?

Just recently I realised that, to me, programming languages are like musical instruments.

Improved eyecare using GPUs

Author: Alan Gray
Posted: 12 Nov 2015 | 13:49

A recent MSc project at EPCC has paved the way for improved diagnosis of eye-related conditions.

Supercomputer driving tests

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 16 Dec 2014 | 11:27

In 2013, the DiRAC consortium rolled out the DiRAC driving licence, a software skills aptitude test for researchers wanting to use DiRAC's high-performance computing resources. Now ARCHER, the UK National Supercomputing Service, is to roll out an ARCHER driving test.

Despite their similar names, these tests differ in nature, intent, scale and reward. In this post, EPCC's Mike JacksonAndrew Turner and Clair Barrass compare and contrast these two supercomputer tests. 

Software Carpentry returns to Edinburgh

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 11 Dec 2014 | 12:24

Edinburgh Software Carpentry workshop attendeesLast week EPCC's ARCHER training team ran another Software Carpentry workshop here in Edinburgh, on 3rd and 4th of December. The workshop provided attendees with an introduction to version control and Git, building programs with Python, automating tasks with Make, and how (and how much) to test programs. These were set within the context of best practices for scientific computing.

MPI: sending and receiving in multi-threaded MPI implementations

Author: Daniel Holmes
Posted: 5 Jul 2013 | 16:06

Have you ever wanted to send a message using MPI to a specific thread in a multi-threaded MPI process? With the current MPI Standard, there is no way to identify one thread from another. The whole MPI process has a single rank in each communicator.

Collaborating with EPCC

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 3 Jul 2013 | 08:38
 
This post was written by Jon Hill from Imperial College, who used to work at EPCC and has been collaborating with us recently. 
A snapshot of a tsunami simulation of the 1755 Lisbon seismogenic tsunami.

I always jump at the chance to work with EPCC. Not just because they are my former employers (ah, the joys of Friday buns). Nor is it due to Edinburgh  being one of my favourite cities and collaborating with EPCC is a good excuse to visit. The main reason for collaborating with EPCC is to use the wealth of experience the people working there have on making scientific code go even faster. Whilst this is extremely important to our research, we don't have the time to do both science and improve code performance.

Using high-performance computing to improve a Scottish SME’s modelling software

Author: Ronnie Galloway
Posted: 24 Jun 2013 | 10:28

Glasgow-based Integrated Environmental Solutions (IES) is benefitting from a collaboration with EPCC. The project is part of Supercomputing Scotland, a joint EPCC and Scottish Enterprise programme designed to introduce advanced computing into Scottish business.

CP2K-UK: Now recruiting!

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 20 Jun 2013 | 13:48

'CP2K-UK' is a new project starting shortly at EPCC, aiming to nurture the growth of a self-sustaining user and developer community around the CP2K materials science code here in the UK. I have been working on CP2K for nearly 5 years now thanks to a series of HECToR dCSE and PRACE projects, so it is great to get a chance to work on some of the more fundamental issues around usability and sustainability of the code, thanks to success in the EPSRC 'Software for the Future' call.

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