Guest blogger's blog

IoT Research and Innovation service

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 9 Jul 2019 | 13:51

Guest blogger Simon Chapple introduces the University of Edinburgh's IoT Research and Innovation Service.

Most people will have heard of the Internet of Things (IoT). It is a hot topic in technology, business and the mainstream news, projected as it is to underpin a future trillion-dollar market at least as large as, and by some estimations even greater than, the cloud-based computing services industry. We define IoT as a network of dedicated physical objects that contain embedded technology to sense and interact with the external environment, and that can connect and exchange data.

Active matter in an active city

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 9 Jul 2019 | 13:39

Giuseppe Negro undertook an HPC-Europa3 visit based in Edinburgh from 15/04/19–27/05/19. He gives us a brief overview of his visit and the work he undertook.

Hi everyone! My name is Giuseppe Negro and I am a PhD student at the University of Bari in Italy. I work in computational modelling of soft matter systems with Prof. Giuseppe Gonnella and with my collegue Livio Nicola Carenza, who was also an HPC-Europa3 visitor in Edinburgh, at the Department of Physics in Bari. I visited EPCC under the HPC-Europa3 transnational access programme, and I was hosted by Prof. D. Marenduzzo at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Edinburgh located at the James Clerk Maxwell Building.

Privacy, transparency and control: disrupting the charitable-giving sector

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 18 Jun 2019 | 15:57

EPCC has been working closely with Edinburgh-based fintech company Sustainably, supporting its rapid growth in the charitable giving sector. Here Loral Quinn, Co-founder and CEO at Sustainably, describes our collaboration.

Sustainably is disrupting a $400 billion market by making it easier for businesses and consumers to have a positive impact every day by rounding up cashless transactions and donating spare change to causes they care about automatically every time they shop.

Edinburgh Carpentries: spreading good practice in software

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 14 May 2019 | 10:24

Lucia Michielin, currently working for the Software Sustainability Institute, tells us about the Edinburgh Carpentries effort and a networking event to be held on the 24th of May.

Edinburgh Carpentries, a new training initiative, was launched on September 2018 at the University of Edinburgh in collaboration with the Software Sustainability Institute. Since then the initiative has started to propagate to other institutes in the Edinburgh area, eg Heriot Watt University. Edinburgh Carpentries uses and leverages teaching materials and infrastructure from The Carpentries (carpentries.org.

HPC-Europa3 visitor publishes paper in Physical Review Letters

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 1 Mar 2019 | 12:33

Former HPC-EUROPA3 visitor Dr Mats Simmermacher, Dr Adam Kirrander (Mats' host from the University of Edinburgh's School of Chemistry), and their collaborators from Edinburgh and Copenhagen have recently published a paper in the prestigious Physical Review Letters where they discuss a new effect in ultrafast X-ray scattering. 

Applications to Software Sustainability Institute Fellowship Programme 2019 are now open

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 10 Dec 2018 | 10:59

By Raniere Silva, Community Officer at the Software Sustainability Institute.

Apply to the Software Sustainability Institute Fellowship Programme 2019.

The Software Sustainability Institute is pleased to announce applications to our Fellowship Programme 2019 are now open. Below we detail the application process and what to expect from us during the recruitment and post-recruitment stages.

My HPC-Europa visit to EPCC

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 20 Nov 2018 | 09:08

 

Pablo C. Cañizares came on an HPC-Europa3 visit to EPCC from 23 July–24 October 2018. In this blog article he summarises his visit.

Hi there! I'm Pablo C. Cañizares, a PhD student in Computer Science from the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), Spain. I work in the Design and Testing of Reliable Systems group in the Computer Science Faculty of the UCM. I visited EPCC for three months under the HPC-Europa3 transnational access programme and was hosted by EPCC's Dr David Henty.

My work experience week at EPCC

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 22 Oct 2018 | 11:39

Seventeen-year-old Sam Dewar spent a week at EPCC in October as part of his school's work experience programme. In this post he describes how he got on.

I spent a week doing work experience at EPCC, where I was given the goal of setting up and testing a homemade Raspberry Pi cluster ‘Wee Archlet’ using a set of instructions provided to me. I also helped find areas for improvement in the instructions by pointing out parts that I struggled to understand so that other people who have little experience with supercomputers can make a cluster too.

SpiNNaker arrives in the Bayes!

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 6 Sep 2018 | 11:28

The SpiNNaker neuromorphic high-performance computing platform, which aims to run 1% of the human brain in real time, will arrive at EPCC in the Bayes building this year. SpiNNaker is a novel hardware platform due to its massive parallelism, multi-cast communication fabric and low power design.

High-performance ray tracing for room acoustics

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 3 Sep 2018 | 15:40

The Auralisation of Acoustics in Architecture project is considering how to improve the modelling of sound qualities in rooms, whether existing, planned or ruined. Brian Hamilton of the University of Edinburgh's Acoustics & Audio Group writes about this collaboration with EPCC.

Last August EPCC’s James Perry, Kostas Kavoussanakis and I started work on the Auralisation of Acoustics in Architecture (A3) project. One of its goals was to explore the use of ray-tracing techniques to model the sound qualities of a room. Such a tool could help optimise the acoustics of an existing or future concert hall, improving the audience’s listening experience. It could also help recreate the sound characteristics of ruined historical spaces.

Pages