August 2013

Dinosaur racing, two months later

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 30 Aug 2013 | 09:43

The PRACE Summer of HPC is a placement programme for undergraduate and postgraduate students. This post was written by Antoine Dewilde, one of the students who spent the summer here at EPCC.

In a previous post, I presented my project on making a dinosaur racing competition. In that post, I gave some background information about virtual palaeontology, and the purpose of my project here in Edinburgh. If you haven’t read it yet, now might be a good time to do so!

So, now that the project (and the summer) is almost finished, let us see what has happened in these past two months – and what you will soon be able to enjoy!

Summer of HPC students @ EPCC: end-of-project videos

Author: Irina Nazarova
Posted: 30 Aug 2013 | 09:04

The first PRACE Summer of HPC (SoHPC) programme has now finished. Each of the 4 students hosted by EPCC has made a short video about their project, which you can watch below. You can also read about the students in my earlier post.

Doing better business with HPC

Author: Terry Sloan
Posted: 28 Aug 2013 | 11:00

EPCC is part of SHAPE (SME HPC Adoption Programme in Europe), a Europe-wide programme designed to spread the benefits of advanced computing to smaller companies by giving them the expertise to use HPC to develop new products, services or ways of working. SHAPE is supported by PRACE, the pan-European Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe .

"What Makes Good Code Good?" at INTECOL13

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 26 Aug 2013 | 10:21

London Docklands

I ran the latest instalment of The Software Sustainability Institute's "What Makes Good Code Good" discussions at INTECOL13 in London's Docklands on 21st August.

I attended at the invitation of Matthew Smith from the BES Computational Ecology Specialist Interest Group and Microsoft Research, and Greg Wilson from Software Carpentry. I'd expected about 20 attendees and was pleasantly surprised (nay, stunned) when about 100 turned up. 

Securely citing datasets

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 22 Aug 2013 | 14:50

This post was written by Adrian Mouat, a former EPCC employee who is now an independent software consultant.

Citing a paper is a reasonably straightforward and well-defined task; just give a reference to the author and the publication you found the paper in and you're pretty much there. Anyone else who wants to look up the reference just has to find the publication and they should see exactly the same text you saw.

Unfortunately, citing datasets is not as simple, at least not if you want the security of knowing that readers who follow the citation will find exactly the same data you used.

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