December 2013

Goodbye BonFIRE project; hello BonFIRE facility

Author: Kostas Kavoussanakis
Posted: 16 Dec 2013 | 09:57

The BonFIRE project created a multi-cloud facility to foster experimentation and testing of cloud and distributed applications. Just last week BonFIRE had its final, successful review. The project was rated Excellent, a true reflection of the effort contributed by the partners and the results that we achieved.

Software

When we started BonFIRE three and a half years ago, we had nothing tangible, only promising people and some ideas. By Month 2 we had the first set of requirements; by Month 4 the first Architecture, including a definition of the BonFIRE offering and the BonFIRE Principles; and by Month 12, the first facility for our partner-experimenters to use. By that time we were a team.

Pervasive Parallelism PhD studentships at EPCC

Author: Mark Bull
Posted: 12 Dec 2013 | 11:54

EPCC was recently successful in its joint bid with Informatics for an EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Pervasive Parallelism. The Centre aims to develop research leaders with deep knowledge and awareness across the parallelism spectrum. To support this, it will support about 10 fully-funded, four-year studentships each year over the next 5 years. The majority will be based in Informatics, but we expect 1 or 2 per year to be available at EPCC.

Software Carpentry returns to Edinburgh

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 11 Dec 2013 | 13:08
 
On the 3rd of December, Software Carpentry returned to Edinburgh with EPCC hosting a boot camp as part of our involvement in both the PRACE Advanced Training Centre and The Software Sustainability Institute.

Research in a nutshell: HPC

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 2 Dec 2013 | 10:13

In this short video 'Research in a nutshell: HPC', I describe my investigations into how high performance computing can be used to go beyond the limits of theory and experiment in many fields of scientific research.

Also in this series, you can watch Prof. Arthur Trew's Computational Science video where he explains the use of computers to simulate systems that are too large, too fast, too slow, or perhaps just too expensive to experiment on.