January 2015

Them bones, them bones: finite element bone-modelling

Author: Neelofer Banglawala
Posted: 27 Jan 2015 | 22:16

Macaque cranium
with muscle
wrapping

I have been re-architecting the solver-side of VOX-FE, a voxel-based finite element bone modelling suite developed by Prof. Michael Fagan's Medical & Biological Engineering group at the University of Hull. The suite comprises a GUI (you can read more about it in this blog post) and a linear solver. VOX-FE creates bone models made up of small cuboid elements by directly converting Computed Tomographic data into these elements. This circumvents the problems faced by the more common method of model creation via mesh interpolation (loss of detail, scaling issues). VOX-FE's approach makes modelling an entire skull with surrounding soft tissue a realisable goal. However, it’s not quite there yet.

VOX-FE GUI developments

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 25 Jan 2015 | 15:55

For the last few years, I have had the opportunity to collaborate with Prof. Michael Fagan of the Medical and Biological Engineering group at the University of Hull on the development of his VOX-FE voxel finite-element (FE) bone modelling software. Past projects under EPSRC and HECToR dCSE funding allowed us to improve the scaling of the core solver and implementent parallel I/O, but it has become increasingly apparently that this was papering over the cracks, and a complete re-engineering of the code base would be required to make it portable, scalable and flexible enough to be useable.  

Using HPC to understand human hearing

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 23 Jan 2015 | 14:58

The Auditory pilot project, involving EPCC and the University’s Acoustics and Audio Group, sought to use HPC to enable faster run times for computational models of the human hearing organ. Dr Michael Newton of the Group explains the work.

Contributing to the energy security of the UK via STOR – the Short-Term Operating Reserve

Author: Mike Brown
Posted: 19 Jan 2015 | 11:03

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transformer park, Advanced Computing Facility Plant Room C.

The media has reported recently that there is now a potential significant shortfall in UK electricity generating capacity due to the decommissioning of legacy fossil-fuel and nuclear stations and the continued delays in the provision of viable low-carbon alternatives.

Energy efficiency in parallel computing

Author: Michele Weiland
Posted: 14 Jan 2015 | 15:30

The Adept project is addressing the challenge of the energy-efficient use of parallel technologies. It builds on the expertise of software developers from high-performance computing to exploit parallelism for performance, and on the expertise of Embedded systems engineers in managing energy usage. Adept is developing a tool to guide software developers and help them model and predict the power consumption and performance of parallel software and hardware.

Pages