HPC research

NEXTGenIO: the next exciting stage begins!

Author: Michele Weiland
Posted: 24 Nov 2016 | 14:32

NEXTGenIO was one of several EC-funded exascale projects that we started work on last year. Here’s what’s been happening since it launched.

ePython: supporting Python on many core co-processors

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 10 Nov 2016 | 11:24

Supercomputing, the biggest conference in our calendar, is on next week and one of the activities I am doing is presenting a paper at the workshop on Python for High-Performance and Scientific Computing.

How do you solve a problem like Sierpinski?

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 7 Nov 2016 | 15:32

I promised in a post last month that I'd write some more about the PrimeGrid project, and it so happened this week that we made a discovery which gives me a good excuse to blog! On 31st October 2016 at 22:13:54 UTC a computer owned by Péter Szabolcs of Hungary reported via the BOINC distributed computing software that the number 10223*231172165+1 was prime.

Self racing cars

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 16 Sep 2016 | 11:34

Roborace DevBot on the trackAutonomous racing

Recently EPCC's Alan Gray and I attended a workshop at Donington Park held by Roborace.  For those who've not heard of Roborace, it's a project to build and race autonomous cars, along the lines of Formula 1 but without any drivers or human control of the cars.  Actually, it's more like Formula E but without drivers, as the plan is for the cars to be electric.

​ Exploring energy efficiency

Author: Mirren White
Posted: 1 Sep 2016 | 10:03

The ADEPT project is creating tools that can be used to design more efficient HPC systems.

Energy efficiency is one of the key challenges of modern computing – in an era where even the most efficient supercomputers come with massive energy bills, technology that can help to increase energy efficiency is critical to sustainable HPC development.

MPI performance on KNL

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 30 Aug 2016 | 12:22

Knights Landing MPI performance

Following on from our recent post on early experiences with KNL performance, we have been looking at MPI performance on Intel's latest many-core processor.

MPI ping-pong latency on KNC and IvyBridge
Figure 1

The MPI performance on the first generation of Xeon Phi processor (KNC) was one of the reasons that some of the applications we ported to KNC had poor performance.  Figures 1 and 2 show the latency and bandwidth of an MPI ping-pong benchmark running on a single KNC and on a 2x8-core IvyBridge node.

Forthcoming computational biomolecular research events

Author: Adam Carter
Posted: 9 Aug 2016 | 17:18

BioExcel is a newly launched Centre of Excellence that helps academic and industrial researchers to use high-performance computing and high-throughput computing in biomolecular research. 

We are running a number of events in September and October and I would be very grateful to anybody who circulates these to people or groups that may be interested (and bonus points if you are willing to share with me details of where/to whom you publicise so that we can reduce cross-posting).

 

Early experiences with KNL

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 29 Jul 2016 | 16:45

Initial experiences on early KNL

Updated 1st August 2016 to add a sentence describing the MPI configurations of the benchmarks run.
Updated 30th August 2016 to add CASTEP performance numbers on Broadwell with some discussion

EPCC was lucky enough to be allowed access to Intel's early KNL (Knights Landing, Intel's new Xeon Phi processor) cluster, through our IPCC project.  KNL Processor Die

KNL is a many-core processor, successor to the KNC, that has up to 72 cores, each of which can run 4 threads, and 16 GB of high bandwidth memory stacked directly on to the chip.

Bringing art and science together

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 1 Jul 2016 | 10:58

This week I have been at the FEAT (Future Emerging Art and Technology) workshop in Vienna, which aims to promote collaboration between scientists and artists. As I am sure many people will be aware, the EU-funded Future and Emerging Technology (FET) programme consists of scientific projects looking to push the boundaries of research in specific fields.

Collaboration, collaboration, collaboration

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 15 Jun 2016 | 13:35

This week sees our annual collaboration workshop with Tsukuba University, Japan (more details are available here).  This is a great chance to get a flavour of the kind of research another HPC centre is undertaking, how they work, and what platforms they are investing in.

The Centre for Computational Sciences (CCS) at Tsukuba is a department very like EPCC, in that it is responsible for high performance and parallel computing at the university, runs and supports large-scale computers for researchers, and undertakes parallel computing research.

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