Modelling & simulation

1st Annual CP2K UK users' meeting

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 6 Feb 2014 | 09:50

Last week we held the first in a series of annual meetings for the CP2K user community at the University of London Garden Halls.

I blogged about it in the run-up to the meeting, but as with any first until you're there you don't know quite what to expect. I was very pleased to see over 50 attendees on the day, ranging from new PhD students to professors, and expert CP2K users to complete novices.

Goodbye BonFIRE project; hello BonFIRE facility

Author: Kostas Kavoussanakis
Posted: 16 Dec 2013 | 09:57

The BonFIRE project created a multi-cloud facility to foster experimentation and testing of cloud and distributed applications. Just last week BonFIRE had its final, successful review. The project was rated Excellent, a true reflection of the effort contributed by the partners and the results that we achieved.

Software

When we started BonFIRE three and a half years ago, we had nothing tangible, only promising people and some ideas. By Month 2 we had the first set of requirements; by Month 4 the first Architecture, including a definition of the BonFIRE offering and the BonFIRE Principles; and by Month 12, the first facility for our partner-experimenters to use. By that time we were a team.

EPCC explores Soft Condensed Matter

Author: Oliver Henrich
Posted: 11 Nov 2013 | 10:55

Today computer simulation is firmly established as the third pillar of science beside theory and experiment. As part of its research activities on modelling and large-scale simulation of soft condensed matter, EPCC maintains a long-standing collaboration with the Institute for Condensed Matter and Complex Systems (ICMCS) at the University of Edinburgh and the Centre for Computational Science at University College London.

Project ExTASY: solving the sampling problem

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 15 Oct 2013 | 12:18

Alongside APES, EPCC plays an important role in another project jointly funded by EPSRC and the US National Science Foundation to overcome one of the "Grand Challenges in the Chemical Sciences".

Free Energy Landscape of Alanine-12

Dinosaur racing, two months later

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 30 Aug 2013 | 09:43

The PRACE Summer of HPC is a placement programme for undergraduate and postgraduate students. This post was written by Antoine Dewilde, one of the students who spent the summer here at EPCC.

In a previous post, I presented my project on making a dinosaur racing competition. In that post, I gave some background information about virtual palaeontology, and the purpose of my project here in Edinburgh. If you haven’t read it yet, now might be a good time to do so!

So, now that the project (and the summer) is almost finished, let us see what has happened in these past two months – and what you will soon be able to enjoy!

Summer of HPC students @ EPCC: end-of-project videos

Author: Irina Nazarova
Posted: 30 Aug 2013 | 09:04

The first PRACE Summer of HPC (SoHPC) programme has now finished. Each of the 4 students hosted by EPCC has made a short video about their project, which you can watch below. You can also read about the students in my earlier post.

How fast is a dinosaur?

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 19 Aug 2013 | 10:40

Is a dinosaur faster if it has longer legs? Is it better for it to be bigger, and hence cover more distance, or to be smaller and lighter? Which species is the fastest? Thanks to high-performance computing, you will soon be able to experiment yourself, and try and find answers to all those questions!

Next Generation Sound Synthesis

Author: James Perry
Posted: 13 Aug 2013 | 14:16
When you think about applications for high performance computing and large-scale simulations, you probably think of particle physics, or climate modelling, maybe molecular biology. You probably don't think of music. But the Next Generation Sound Synthesis project (NESS) may change that.
 

Collaborating with EPCC

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 3 Jul 2013 | 08:38
 
This post was written by Jon Hill from Imperial College, who used to work at EPCC and has been collaborating with us recently. 
A snapshot of a tsunami simulation of the 1755 Lisbon seismogenic tsunami.

I always jump at the chance to work with EPCC. Not just because they are my former employers (ah, the joys of Friday buns). Nor is it due to Edinburgh  being one of my favourite cities and collaborating with EPCC is a good excuse to visit. The main reason for collaborating with EPCC is to use the wealth of experience the people working there have on making scientific code go even faster. Whilst this is extremely important to our research, we don't have the time to do both science and improve code performance.

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