Public outreach

EPCC goes doon the water

Author: Alistair Grant
Posted: 31 Mar 2014 | 10:49

This month, Mario, Toni and I took a trip 'doon the water' to Rothesay Academy to introduce some of the concepts of supercomputing to first and second year pupils.

Rothesay is on the Isle of Bute and during the 19th century it was famous for its hydropathic establishments and treatments. Our team had been invited to visit the school as part of National Science and Engineering Week 2014, and we spent the day showing some of the demonstrations developed by EPCC for explaining the basics of supercomputing and its uses. 

MSc in HPC Guest Lecture Series 2014

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 4 Mar 2014 | 11:54

Every year I have the pleasure (and challenge!) of organising a series of guest lectures as part of EPCC's MSc in HPC. The lectures form part of the HPC Ecosystem course, and aim to give students an appreciation of the current issues and experiences of real-world HPC practioners.

Supercomputing and prime numbers in Mathematics Today!

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 6 Jan 2014 | 14:51

As a follow-up to speaking at the British Science Festival in Sept 2013, I was asked to write an article for the Institute of Mathematics & its Applications about the PrimeGrid project. The full article is available online, or in the Dec 2013 edition of the Mathematics Today magazine.

EPCC and the library visit

Author: Alistair Grant
Posted: 21 Oct 2013 | 10:16

The library in Dalkeith was the setting for EPCC 's event at the Midlothian Science Festival, where we hoped to introduce and explain what supercomputers are and why they are needed.

A Day at Our Dynamic Earth

Author: Alistair Grant
Posted: 5 Oct 2013 | 12:01

Image of Audience Group at ODE

In September, Our Dynamic Earth held a two-day event called 'Meet the Experts' for groups of secondary school pupils. EPCC was invited to attend, with Iain Bethune and myself volunteering to give short talks on what supercomputing is and why it is needed. 

Prime Numbers talk: audio and slides

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 4 Oct 2013 | 11:02

As mentioned in Alistair Grant's blog about our exhibition at the British Science Festival, I also gave a talk as part of the BSF Maths programme entitled "PrimeGrid: Join in the search for a world record prime number".

Supercomputing at Bang Goes the Borders

Author: Mario Antonioletti
Posted: 23 Sep 2013 | 09:43
 
For the second year running, EPCC attended Bang Goes the Borders, a free science festival held in St Mary's Primary School in Melrose. This was my first time at the festival but my fellow EPCC'ers Iain Bethune and Terry Sloan were old hands, both having done it last year. We set up four stands in a classroom we were allocated, with the first overseen by Terry who ran two exercises showing the benefits of using parallelism to solve problems.

Virtual Palaeontology: the debut!

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 16 Sep 2013 | 12:56

This summer we were fortunate to have a student, Antoine, work on our dinosaur-racing outreach project as part of the Summer of HPC programme. Antoine did a great job in turning the demo from a simple prototype into a much more polished, usable showcase for how HPC plays a vital role in a variety of sciences. If you are a regular reader of the EPCC blog then you might have already read some posts about this application - see my initial blog post, and Antoine's progress updates here and here.

Supercomputing dinosaurs at the BSF

Author: Alistair Grant
Posted: 11 Sep 2013 | 10:13

What do dinosaurs, prime numbers, four individuals from EPCC and Cray, and the city of Newcastle have in common? Not much until the four descended on Newcastle to take part in the British Science Festival 2013 with demonstrations about virtual dinosaurs and a talk about prime numbers.

Nick explaining how the dinosaur sim works.

After some early morning travel down the east coast of the UK from Edinburgh to Newcastle, the four - Iain (the intrepid prime number man), Nick (keeper of the virtual dinosaurs), Tom (the man from Cray) and myself -  set up a room in the Discovery Museum in quick time. The Learning Room, as it was called, was next to the Museum Archives where, if you looked closely in one of the cabinets, you could see a first-generation iPad.

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