Public outreach

Introducing Wee Archie

Author: Alistair Grant
Posted: 26 Nov 2015 | 15:29

 

The EPCC Outreach team is always looking for new ways to introduce supercomputing to a general audience. Remote connections to ARCHER could be used, but how would audiences know what is happening? Is it really running on a remote system or is it faked? Enter Wee Archie: a portable, functional cluster developed by EPCC to demonstrate applications and concepts relating to parallel systems. 

ARCHER Impact Awards Competition 2015: winners announced

Author: Clair Barrass
Posted: 10 Nov 2015 | 10:28

We are delighted to announce the winners of the 2015 ARCHER Impact Award Competitions.

EPCC at Supercomputing: Booth 2503

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 13 Oct 2015 | 11:28

EPCC Stand layoutEPCC at SC15

Preparations for EPCC's booth at SC15 are currently in full swing. This year we have revamped our stand, ordering a custom-built display (see pics below). 

In previous years we have used a combination of smaller displays to populate the space we have at the conference. However, it's often hard to get a coherent and consistent look for the booth when using an adhoc approach like this, hence this years' decision to create a display that is tailored to the space we have on the exhibition floor at Supercomputing.

What's inside the box? Building computers from scratch

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 28 Sep 2015 | 13:28

Last weekend, a team of us attended Bang Goes The Borders, a regional science festival hosted by St Mary's school in Melrose.

This was the fourth year we've been there, and as usual there were around 1000 school kids and their families keen to get their hands on all kinds of science- and technology-based activities.

Although our "dinoracer" has been a big favourite for the last few years, this time we took along two completely new activities: the Supercomputing App and the Build-a-PC Junkyard Challenge - which I'd like to tell you about...

EPCC Roadshow: Big Data and HPC for Life Sciences and Healthcare

Author: George Graham
Posted: 16 Sep 2015 | 15:40

During August and September we ran a series of seminar events across Scotland, in collaboration with three major actors in the Scottish life science sector: BioCity, BioQuarter and BioDundee. 

If you weren’t lucky enough to come to one of our seminars (and the complementary lunch) on the application of HPC and Big Data in life sciences then you might want to catch up by reading the associated case study.

The cluster challenge game nears completion

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 11 Sep 2015 | 11:49

This summer we hosted a PRACE Summer of HPC student, Anna, who has been working with us on an HPC supercomputer cluster challenge game which she previously blogged about here. The idea of this has been to gamify the design of a supercomputer, balancing the desire for advanced components (CPU, memory and accelerators) against budget and power efficiency.

Big Data: What's wrong with HPC?

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 3 Sep 2015 | 17:55

Big Data vs HPC

Whilst I was writing my talk for last week's How to Make Big Data work for your business seminar at Edinburgh BioQuarter, it occurred to me that the way computational simulation codes have evolved over the last 40 years has really been a response to big data issues. 

Cluster Challenge Application sneak peek

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 21 Aug 2015 | 11:09

Anna Chantzoplaki is working on the project “HPC Cluster Challenge app” with EPCC's Nick Brown and Amy Krause as part of the PRACE Summer of HPC Summer School. This project is developing a public outreach application that will allow participants to design their own computer cluster by choosing components within a fixed budget, configuring them and measuring performance. 

ARCHER Impact Awards Competition 2015

Author: Clair Barrass
Posted: 4 Aug 2015 | 09:24

ARCHER Impact Award 2015

ARCHER Impact Award will recognise and reward researchers working on ARCHER, as individuals or teams, whose work has had substantial impact on the economy and society. The awards will showcase the researchers, their work and the impact of the science that the UK National HPC facility, ARCHER, has enabled.

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