Software development

EPCC wins HPC Innovation Excellence Award

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 24 Jun 2014 | 14:10

Electrostatic potential fluctuations in an annular region at mid-radius in the MAST tokamak, from a gyrokinetic simulation of the saturated turbulence using the GS2 code. A wedge of plasma has been removed from the visualisation so as to view the nature of the fluctuations inside the annulus.EPCC is delighted to be part of a team that has won an HPC Innovation Excellence Award. Presented at the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC14) in Leipzig (22-26 June 2014), the awards recognise outstanding application of HPC Computing for Business and Scientific Achievements.

Causing a Storm in MPI: easier data processing for scientists

Author: Amy Krause
Posted: 17 Jun 2014 | 15:00

After several years of working with users who are not computer scientists (seismologists and geoscientists), we have realised two main points: these communities usually have problems that should be addressed with parallel computing, but they don't often have the skills and training to do so. We set out to build a programming library, Dispel4Py, that both enables users to easily write a description of a data-processing application and takes care of running that application in different parallel environments.

EPCC at ISC'14: come and say hello!

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 13 Jun 2014 | 12:06

EPCC will be exhibiting in Booth 920.

International Supercomputing Conference (ISC) is one of the main events in the field of high performance computing, networking and storage. It has a diverse programme of keynote talks, research presentations, tutorials, BoFs and satellite events provided by 300 expert speakers along with over 170 exhibitors and 3,000 attendees. As usual, there will be a significant EPCC representation.

CFD: parallel sustainability with TPLS

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 28 Apr 2014 | 16:20

Mathematical modelling of complex fluid flows has practical application within many industrial sectors including energy, the environment and health. Flow modelling can include oil and gas flows in long-distance pipelines or refinery distillation columns, liquid cooling of micro-electronic devices, carbon capture and cleaning processes, water treatment plants, blood flows in arteries, and enzyme interactions. Multi-phase flow modelling models flows consisting of gases, fluids and solids within a single system eg steam and water, or oil and gas within a pipe, or coal dust in the air.

Exploring the integration of Subversion and Git with CVS

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 7 Apr 2014 | 07:33

A brain scan.Michael Chappell leads the Quantitative Biomedical Inference (QuBIc) research group within the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Oxford. Michael has developed a method of processing functional magnetic resonance image (MRI) data that can be used to recognise blood flow patterns in the brain. I have been helping Michael through one of The Software Sustainability Institute's consultancy projects, which he applied for through the Institute's open call. Part of our collaboration looked at issues around integrating Subversion or Git repositories with CVS.

Re-imagining the lab. Or, when science meets art

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 13 Mar 2014 | 15:07

LabBook being used with a tablet and stylusLabBook is a mobile app and online service that allows users to securely record and share their experiment notes. LabBook's developers - Mark Woodbridge, Geraint Barton and Derek Huntley of Imperial College London's Bioinformatics Support Service - asked The Software Sustainability Institute for consultancy as part of the Institute's open call.

I've been working with them to provide advice on the LabBook software, how it is developed, and how it can be moved towards an open source product.

When applications go exascale — the CRESTA project

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 10 Feb 2014 | 09:22

Dr Jason Beech-Brandt, Manager Exascale Research, Europe at Cray writes about the CRESTA project, which is addressing the challenges of exascale computing.

Seymour Cray, the pioneer of supercomputing, famously asked if you would rather plough a field with two strong oxen or 1024 chickens.

Answering Questions

Author: Alistair Grant
Posted: 22 Jan 2014 | 09:23

On Monday 2 December, I took part in a panel on Software Engineering for the Professional Software Development course at the University of Glasgow's Computing Science department. Organised by Dr Tim Storer, a lecturer in Software Engineering, the panel was an opportunity for 3rd-year students of the computing science and software engineering programmes to quiz a varied group of software engineers.

R users can calculate Hamming distance faster

Author: Terry Sloan
Posted: 10 Jan 2014 | 14:09
 
EPCC and the Division of Pathway Medicine at the University of Edinburgh have released version 1.0.5 of the SPRINT R software package. This includes a new faster parallel implementation of the Hamming distance function.

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