Software development

Nu-FuSE: An Exascale software project

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 16 Nov 2014 | 23:11

The Nu-FuSE (Nuclear Fusion Simulations at Exascale) project was a 3-year, G8 funded, international research project to investigate the challenges and requirements for fusion simulations at Exascale levels. The project’s aim was to significantly improve computational modelling capabilities for fusion, and fusion-related sciences, enhancing the predictive capabilities needed to address key physics challenges of a new generation of fusion systems. 

Collaboration with UK Met Office

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 7 Nov 2014 | 15:39

We are working with the UK Met Office on a project to rewrite one of their weather forecasting models. Whilst the best known weather model is the Unified Model (UM), which generates the national and international forecast on a scale of 1km, the Met Office also has a number of other specialist models that concentrate on specific areas.  An example of this is in the study of cloud and cloud convection, in which case one often uses a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model which handles turbulence in much more detail. 

SPRINT v. 1.0.7 released on CRAN (R package repository)

Author: Eilidh Troup
Posted: 30 Oct 2014 | 16:28

sprinter

It's always good to end a project on a high so I was delighted to end my recent assignment to the SPRINT project by overcoming a few tricky technical obstacles and having the latest version of SPRINT accepted into the CRAN repository of add-on packages to the very popular R statistical computing software. This will make it much easier for users to discover and install SPRINT and gain from the fast processing of larger data sets that it can provide.

Applications open for Software Sustainability Institute 2015 Fellows

Author: Mario Antonioletti
Posted: 3 Sep 2014 | 13:30

The Software Sustainability Institute's Fellowship 2015 application process is now open.

The Fellowship Programme run by the Software Sustainability Institute (SSI) could fund you by up to £3000 over a fifteen-month period to become Software Sustainability ambassadors within your research community (or communities if you belong to more than one). It can also allow you to share your expertise and advice with the SSI. The Programme will enourage you to develop your interests in the area of software sustainability (especially in your own area of work). And it's a fantastic and active interdisciplinary community to be involved with, as well as providing you with a great CV entry! The Fellowship is open to UK-based applicants. If you are interested then read on.

Talking HPC with the Omega Tau podcast

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 11 Aug 2014 | 09:36

Omega Tau: science and engineering in your headphones is a STEM-themed podcast produced by Markus Völter and Nora Ludewig which covers a wide range of interesting topics including aerospace, spaceflight, computing and physical sciences in great detail through interviews and discussions with area experts.

PRACE Summer of HPC 2014

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 4 Aug 2014 | 11:38

This summer we have two students who have joined us for 9 weeks as part of the Summer of HPC programme. It is a great idea; in working on an HPC project not only do the students gain experience and enthusiasm for the field but also the actual work done on the projects is useful and important too.

Autotuning NekBone for OpenACC

Author: Luis Cebamanos
Posted: 3 Jul 2014 | 12:12

Nek5000 being used to simulate of turbulent thermal transport in sodium-cooled reactor cores. Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory.

Heterogeneous HPC architectures are becoming increasingly prevalent in the Top500 list with CPU-based nodes being enhanced by accelerators or coprocessors optimized for floating-point calculations. This trend is likely to increase as we move towards Exascale (1018 flops) capable systems and it is vital that the relevant HPC applications are able to exploit this heterogeneity [1, 2]. 

Optimising OpenMP implementation of Tinker, a molecular dynamics modelling package

Author: Weronika Filinger
Posted: 3 Jul 2014 | 11:42

Do you use scientific codes in your research? Are the things you can do with it limited by the execution time? The code has been parallelised but does not scale well? How should you go about improving the performance? What can you do when you do not have full understanding of the code? There are some general steps that can be taken to improve the performance of parallelised codes. In this article I will describe briefly the process I have undertaken to optimise the parallel performance of a computational chemistry package, TINKER, as part of the EPCC/SSI APES project.

SPRINT v1.0.6 released! OpenMPI and R V3 compatible

Author: Terry Sloan
Posted: 30 Jun 2014 | 13:30
 
EPCC and the Division of Pathway Medicine at the University of Edinburgh have released version 1.0.6 of the SPRINT R software package. This is compatible with R Version 3 and now supports OpenMPI as well as MPICH.

EPCC wins HPC Innovation Excellence Award

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 24 Jun 2014 | 14:10

Electrostatic potential fluctuations in an annular region at mid-radius in the MAST tokamak, from a gyrokinetic simulation of the saturated turbulence using the GS2 code. A wedge of plasma has been removed from the visualisation so as to view the nature of the fluctuations inside the annulus.EPCC is delighted to be part of a team that has won an HPC Innovation Excellence Award. Presented at the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC14) in Leipzig (22-26 June 2014), the awards recognise outstanding application of HPC Computing for Business and Scientific Achievements.

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