Simulation

Nu-FuSE: An Exascale software project

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 16 Nov 2014 | 23:11

The Nu-FuSE (Nuclear Fusion Simulations at Exascale) project was a 3-year, G8 funded, international research project to investigate the challenges and requirements for fusion simulations at Exascale levels. The project’s aim was to significantly improve computational modelling capabilities for fusion, and fusion-related sciences, enhancing the predictive capabilities needed to address key physics challenges of a new generation of fusion systems. 

HPC for business

Author: Mark Sawyer
Posted: 18 Aug 2014 | 13:10

The Fortissimo project, which is coordinated here at EPCC, gives companies a low-risk opportunity to try out HPC. By combining it with cloud computing, they can gain the benefits without buying and running their own systems. Here are three examples of HPC in action under Fortissimo.

Fortissimo! Digital simulation and modelling for European industry

Author: Mark Parsons
Posted: 10 Oct 2013 | 10:27

I am very pleased to announce the start of Fortissimo, a 3-year project led by EPCC that will focus on the development of a Cloud of HPC resources for use, initially, by European manufacturing companies, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Supercomputing at Bang Goes the Borders

Author: Mario Antonioletti
Posted: 23 Sep 2013 | 09:43
 
For the second year running, EPCC attended Bang Goes the Borders, a free science festival held in St Mary's Primary School in Melrose. This was my first time at the festival but my fellow EPCC'ers Iain Bethune and Terry Sloan were old hands, both having done it last year. We set up four stands in a classroom we were allocated, with the first overseen by Terry who ran two exercises showing the benefits of using parallelism to solve problems.

Virtual Palaeontology: the debut!

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 16 Sep 2013 | 12:56

This summer we were fortunate to have a student, Antoine, work on our dinosaur-racing outreach project as part of the Summer of HPC programme. Antoine did a great job in turning the demo from a simple prototype into a much more polished, usable showcase for how HPC plays a vital role in a variety of sciences. If you are a regular reader of the EPCC blog then you might have already read some posts about this application - see my initial blog post, and Antoine's progress updates here and here.

Supercomputing dinosaurs at the BSF

Author: Alistair Grant
Posted: 11 Sep 2013 | 10:13

What do dinosaurs, prime numbers, four individuals from EPCC and Cray, and the city of Newcastle have in common? Not much until the four descended on Newcastle to take part in the British Science Festival 2013 with demonstrations about virtual dinosaurs and a talk about prime numbers.

Nick explaining how the dinosaur sim works.

After some early morning travel down the east coast of the UK from Edinburgh to Newcastle, the four - Iain (the intrepid prime number man), Nick (keeper of the virtual dinosaurs), Tom (the man from Cray) and myself -  set up a room in the Discovery Museum in quick time. The Learning Room, as it was called, was next to the Museum Archives where, if you looked closely in one of the cabinets, you could see a first-generation iPad.

Doing better business with HPC

Author: Terry Sloan
Posted: 28 Aug 2013 | 11:00

EPCC is part of SHAPE (SME HPC Adoption Programme in Europe), a Europe-wide programme designed to spread the benefits of advanced computing to smaller companies by giving them the expertise to use HPC to develop new products, services or ways of working. SHAPE is supported by PRACE, the pan-European Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe .

Dinosaur racing at EPCC

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 31 Jul 2013 | 14:49

The Animal Simulation project, run at the University of Manchester, aims to create realistic simulations of animals both present and extinct. By combining the expertise of a number of scientific fields along with high performance computing (HPC), they have created GaitSym, a code capable of realistically simulating movements of animals based on a 3D model of their skeleton and biological data.

Collaborating with EPCC

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 3 Jul 2013 | 08:38
 
This post was written by Jon Hill from Imperial College, who used to work at EPCC and has been collaborating with us recently. 
A snapshot of a tsunami simulation of the 1755 Lisbon seismogenic tsunami.

I always jump at the chance to work with EPCC. Not just because they are my former employers (ah, the joys of Friday buns). Nor is it due to Edinburgh  being one of my favourite cities and collaborating with EPCC is a good excuse to visit. The main reason for collaborating with EPCC is to use the wealth of experience the people working there have on making scientific code go even faster. Whilst this is extremely important to our research, we don't have the time to do both science and improve code performance.

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