Blog

Broadcasting your shell output

Author: Mario Antonioletti
Posted: 18 Oct 2018 | 12:47

During a Software Carpentry course you, as an instructor, stand in front of a class typing your lesson content, eg bash or git, and the students type what you type into their own shell.

Depending on the layout of the room, you need to make the font on your terminal large enough for all students to see it, which can be somewhat disorientating as an instructor. Moreover if the layout of the room is not ideal, eg some students are facing away from the screen, they will have to constantly turn to see the screen, which can be a pain for them. But I recently found a Python app that changes all that.

Analysing humanities data using Cray Urika-GX

Author: Rosa Filgueira
Posted: 11 Oct 2018 | 14:52

During the last six months, in our role as members of the Research Engineering Group of the Alan Turing Institute, we have been working with Melissa Terras, University of Edinburgh's College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (CAHSS), and Raquel Alegre, Research IT Services, University College London (UCL), to explore text analysis of humanities data. This work was funded by Scottish Enterprise as part of the Alan Turing Institute-Scottish Enterprise Data Engineering Programme.

Inaugural Edinburgh Research Software Engineering (RSE) Meeting

Author: Mario Antonioletti
Posted: 30 Sep 2018 | 20:28

Edinburgh just held its inaugural Research Software Engineer (RSE) meeting at the Bayes Centre (also home to EPCC). It was attended by about 50 people from the Edinburgh area. If you don't know what a Research Software Engineer is, I urge you to look at Andy's slides for context and background.

Bang Goes the Borders 2018

Author: Mario Antonioletti
Posted: 28 Sep 2018 | 09:29

While a team of EPCCers were doing outreach in London at New Scientist Live (NSLive) for a second year running, another group of us attended Bang Goes the Borders (BGTB) at St Mary's Primary School in Melrose, which is mostly attended by children aged from 5-12 with their parents. For us this is a relatively local event and this is the eighth year that we been there. It is only a day event but a pretty busy one.

ExCeL-lent EPCC at New Scientist Live 2018

Author: Oliver Brown
Posted: 25 Sep 2018 | 16:44

Regular readers will already know that EPCC was planning to attend New Scientist Live again this year. Despite our concerns about getting to London as Storm Ali bore down on us, we made it, and I’m happy to report we had a very successful and enjoyable trip!

PickCells and exploratory image analysis in cell biology

Author: Mike Jackson
Posted: 11 Sep 2018 | 16:09

Cells being analysed within PickCells

PickCells is an image analysis platform developed by the Centre for Regenerative Medicine (CRM) at The University of Edinburgh. It combines generic image analysis algorithms, visualisation modules and data mining functionality within a stand-alone Java application.

RSE18 conference, Birmingham

Author: Fiona Reid
Posted: 6 Sep 2018 | 14:47

I recently attended the Third Research Software Engineers (RSE) conference in Birmingham, UK. RSE conferences bring together people who work in an RSE-type roll from across the UK and world.

For anyone who doesn’t know, an RSE is typically someone who has expertise in both coding and research but is not necessarily a pure computer programmer or pure researcher. Often RSEs can be the only such person in their department and thus the conference gives them a chance meet other people doing similar roles to share their experiences and help them feel part of a much larger community.

Supercomputing MOOC: learning at scale!

Author: Jane Kennedy
Posted: 6 Sep 2018 | 13:05

What is a MOOC, you ask? The answer is, it's a Massively Open Online Course, and EPCC's Supercomputing MOOC will start on 24th September.

Our MOOC was first launched in June 2017. Since then, it's had another two successful runs, and we're now making preparation for a fourth - not a bad year's work!

SpiNNaker arrives in the Bayes!

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 6 Sep 2018 | 11:28

The SpiNNaker neuromorphic high-performance computing platform, which aims to run 1% of the human brain in real time, will arrive at EPCC in the Bayes building this year. SpiNNaker is a novel hardware platform due to its massive parallelism, multi-cast communication fabric and low power design.

High-performance ray tracing for room acoustics

Author: Guest blogger
Posted: 3 Sep 2018 | 15:40

The Auralisation of Acoustics in Architecture project is considering how to improve the modelling of sound qualities in rooms, whether existing, planned or ruined. Brian Hamilton of the University of Edinburgh's Acoustics & Audio Group writes about this collaboration with EPCC.

Last August EPCC’s James Perry, Kostas Kavoussanakis and I started work on the Auralisation of Acoustics in Architecture (A3) project. One of its goals was to explore the use of ray-tracing techniques to model the sound qualities of a room. Such a tool could help optimise the acoustics of an existing or future concert hall, improving the audience’s listening experience. It could also help recreate the sound characteristics of ruined historical spaces.

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Tracy Peet
+44 (0) 131 650 5362
t.peet@epcc.ed.ac.uk