Blog

ARCHER Image Competition 2016: winner announced

Author: Clair Barrass
Posted: 15 Nov 2016 | 16:11

Winning entry: Birth of a footprint

We are delighted to announce the winner of the ARCHER Image Competition 2016 is Dr Peter Falkingham, Natural Sciences & Psychology Department, Liverpool John Moores University for his image "The birth of a footprint".

The image was selected by the judges for its easily accessible scientific concepts represented by a clear and visually dramatic image.

ePython: supporting Python on many core co-processors

Author: Nick Brown
Posted: 10 Nov 2016 | 11:24

Supercomputing, the biggest conference in our calendar, is on next week and one of the activities I am doing is presenting a paper at the workshop on Python for High-Performance and Scientific Computing.

EPCC at SC16 (booth 701)

Author: Adrian Jackson
Posted: 8 Nov 2016 | 23:59

SC16 LogoSupercomputing 2016

EPCC is gearing up for next week's Supercomputing conference, SC16, in Salt Lake City, USA. If you'll be there too, come and visit us at booth #701. We'll also be involved in a whole range of workshops, panels, birds of a feather sessions (BoFs), and talks.

How do you solve a problem like Sierpinski?

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 7 Nov 2016 | 15:32

I promised in a post last month that I'd write some more about the PrimeGrid project, and it so happened this week that we made a discovery which gives me a good excuse to blog! On 31st October 2016 at 22:13:54 UTC a computer owned by Péter Szabolcs of Hungary reported via the BOINC distributed computing software that the number 10223*231172165+1 was prime.

Nektar++ IO Performance for Aorta test case on ARCHER Cray XC-30

Author: Michael Bareford
Posted: 3 Nov 2016 | 14:01

Nektar++ [1] is an open-source MPI-based spectral element code that combines the accuracy of spectral methods with the geometric flexibility of finite elements, specifically, hp-version FEM. Nektar++ was initially developed by Imperial College London and is one of the ExaFLOW co-design applications being actively developed by the consortium. It supports several scalable solvers for many sets of partial differential equations, from (in)compressible Navier-Stokes to the bidomain model of cardiac electrophysiology.

ARCHER gains parallel Knights Landing capability

Author: Alan Simpson
Posted: 25 Oct 2016 | 15:42

The ARCHER national service is being enhanced by the addition of a parallel Knights Landing (KNL) system that will be available to all ARCHER users. 

Testing code

Author: Stephen Booth
Posted: 24 Oct 2016 | 12:25

It's always a bit of an embarrassment when talking about your code tests. I think most developers know that they don’t have enough tests or that their tests are not good enough.

There is never enough time to either write or to run tests that fully cover all possibilities so, like all types of programming, testing becomes a compromise where you try to make the best use of the limited resources available for testing.

Provenance Tool Suite: Tracking data to its origins

Author: Selina Aragon
Posted: 11 Oct 2016 | 11:32

By Selina Aragon, Communications Officer at the Software Sustainability Institute, in conversation with Trung Dong Huynh, University of Southampton

Dual-resolution simulations with LAMMPS

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 8 Oct 2016 | 11:46

Hierarchy of multiscale modeling

Over the last year I've been working with Prof. Jon Essex of Southampton University on an ARCHER eCSE project with the pithy title of "Implementation of Dual Resolution Simulation Methodology in LAMMPS".  

So what do I mean by dual-resolution simulations?

Found: new world record Twin Primes!

Author: Iain Bethune
Posted: 29 Sep 2016 | 13:55

PrimeGrid logo

Number Theory - the study of the integers - is perhaps one of the purest branches of maths and is not well-known for setting the headlines alight.

Along with the proof of Fermat's Last Theorem in 1995, which earned a knighthood for Sir Andrew Wiles, there was a lot of excitement about the Twin Prime Conjecture a few years ago, beginning a new spurt of progress towards the solution of this thorny mathematical problem.

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